Nary Chou TeacherTuesday

TeacherTuesday: January 29, 2019

Teacher Tuesday

This week’s #TeacherTuesday, Nary Chou, came to the United States as a war refugee from Cambodia at the age of eight, unable to speak a word of English. Her ESL teacher taught her not only “how to read and write,” but “also supported and encouraged me to reach my potential,” simultaneously motivating this Abington Education Association member who teaches fifth grade at Rydal Elementary, to choose this important profession.

Teacher Builds Cultural Bridges

This week’s #TeacherTuesday, Nary Chou, came to the United States as a war refugee from Cambodia at the age of eight, unable to speak a word of English. Her ESL teacher taught her not only “how to read and write,” but “also supported and encouraged me to reach my potential,” simultaneously motivating this Abington Education Association member who teaches fifth grade at Rydal Elementary, to choose this important profession.Nary is inspired “to not only teach the curriculum, but most importantly, to teach my students to embrace their own culture and heritage and help them to learn the skills necessary for a diverse and global community.” She extends her reach by running a school club called C.A.R.E. (Cultural Appreciation at Rydal Elementary). The club provides students with an opportunity to “discuss their own family traditions, learn about games that kids play around the world, and practice different ways to greet one another.” She adds, “More than anything, I hope that the children come away with a respect for one another no matter where we come from.” Tell us what other educators are encouraging the next generation to build bridges between cultures and we’ll feature them in an upcoming #TeacherTuesday.

Posted by Council for the Advancement of Public Schools on Tuesday, January 29, 2019

Nary is inspired “to not only teach the curriculum, but most importantly, to teach my students to embrace their own culture and heritage and help them to learn the skills necessary for a diverse and global community.” She extends her reach by running a school club called C.A.R.E. (Cultural Appreciation at Rydal Elementary). The club provides students with an opportunity to “discuss their own family traditions, learn about games that kids play around the world, and practice different ways to greet one another.” She adds, “More than anything, I hope that the children come away with a respect for one another no matter where we come from.”

Tell us what other educators are encouraging the next generation to build bridges between cultures and we’ll feature them in an upcoming #TeacherTuesday.